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MARILYN MONROE biography

MARILYN MONROE
Born Norma Jean Mortenson on June 1, 19261 Marilyn’s mother was a pretty red haired Hollywood cutter whose husband had left her. She then met Marilyn’s father, a baker and Marilyn was born out of this casual union. Her father’s itinerant behavior and hisMONROEsubsequent abandoning of the mother when she broke the news of her pregnancy left painful scars of rejection that Marilyn could never come to terms with. As though illegitimacy was not a big enough cross to bear Marilyn’s mother soon began to show signs of mental disturbance. She was committed to an institution. Thus, began the life of this rootless little orphan with all its share of insecurity, hurt, desolation and humiliation.

For the first few years Marilyn was transported to foster homes by the Country Welfare Agency. The foster parents were paid 20$ a month for the upkeep of this lost girl. At orphanages she earned a living by cleaning toilets. When she was seven or eight she was seduced by a border in her foster home. He gave her a nickel “not to tell.”On reporting the matter to her foster mother all she got was disbelief, suspicion and an admonishing for tarnishing the name of that "fine gentleman.”The seeds of insecurity were well sown. The security of a warm hearth was something Marilyn never knew. Guit ridden and worn by confused feelings of inadequacy Marilyn grew up with a low self esteem. These early insecurities became an integral part of her unconscious that though dormant were potent enough to shape her life. Marilyn recollecting her childhood said, “l always felt insecure . . . . But most of all I felt scared"
On approaching womanhood Marilyn discovered her one asset that would give her an edge over everyone else. It was her vital exuberant sexuality. “My arrival in school started everybody buzzing. . . . The boys began screaming and groaning." At last she had found a constant in her life that she could rely on. Her dazzling looks gave her confidence that she need not fear rejection any longer. For acceptance her beauty was her baton and she used it unsparingly. So hungry was she for acceptance and affection that she exploited her looks to an extent of what seemed a little short of promiscuity. When barely 16 she entered an matched marriage. Her husband and she separated after about two years apparently withoutsuccess.
In 1944, while working on a defense plant Marilyn’s natal stars began to shine. A United States Army photographer noticing her magnetic sex appeal induced her to pose for posters for the troops. An instant success as a model she was signed by a number of magazines as their ‘Cover Girl.’ She was signed by 20th Century-Fox for a small part. She worked briefly with Columbia Pictures in low budget musical films like Ladies of the Chorus (1949) and Love Happy (1949). At this time a failed love affair with a musical director raked her past insecurities and put her on the road to self annihilation. She attempted suicide. It was only the beginning of a spate of suicidal attempts the last of which was to take her life.
This golden tressed, curvaceous blond Love Goddess with a Madonna’s face was the instant choice of Arthur Horn blow, Jr., and John Houston when they were looking for a face to fill a minor part in their film, The Asphalt Jungle. "As soon as we saw her we knew she was the one,” recalls Horn blow. The virile voluptuousness of Venus combined with the quality of innocent depravity were what sent the audience pulsating to see more of her. She was recognized as that 'Calendar Girl' but instead of disowning her the public vied to never let her go. Her films like All about Eve (1950), Love Nest (1951), Clash by Night (1952) all hailed Marilyn Monroe as the Love icon of the century. In 1953 she received international fame for her roles in films like Niagra, How To Marry A Millionaire and Gentleman Prefer Blondes. 1954 saw her as the leading lady of Fox Productions.
Marilyn married the famous baseball player Joe Di Maggio in 1954. They divorced a year later. Rebelling against her long succession of stereotype roles she sought more challenging roles which a Fox contract offered her. In 1956 she married the playwright Arthur Miller. During the years of their marriage Marilyn said, “Now for the first time, l feel l am not alone anymore. l have a feeling of being sheltered. It's as if l has come in out of the cold. . . . Their marriage lasted four years.
Marilyn’s years in stardom were beset with emotional highs and lows. Unending visits to psychiatrist and compulsive suicidal tendencies beset her life with depression. Beneath theveneer of bubbling callousness was a confused chaotic mind struggling to keep afloat. The fleeting years made her aware of her one enemy time. The ethereal beauty that so captivated the world had begun to wane and with that her only anchor of stability was fast disappearing. She was 36 and the mirror on the wall would not be able to hide the truth any longer. A lethal over dose of barbiturates in 1962 put an end to this saga of romance that had set the passions of millions on fire.
Marilyn’s third husband Arthur Miller dramatized the tragedy of Marilyn Monroe in his play, After The Fall. Her acute sense of victimization was the direct residue of her precarious past. Her sense of vulnerability never allowed her to trust and to believe leading to failed relationships. She required “limitless” love and no man according to Miller is capable of it. A normal woman on maturing needs the reassurance of the mirror only marginally as the years goes by. She relies more heavily on inner self confidence. This Marilyn lacked.
Perhaps deep down Marilyn was still the little lonely Alice lost in the woods. So frightened was she of the gnomes and fairies of this world that lived through life without making any lasting Contact with reality. She drifted in a make belief world ofhers riddled with prejudice some justified and the rest of it unnecessary. This beautiful creature who were the envy of women and the fantasy of men all over died pathetically a lonely figure unaware that the world of love could have been hers if only she had not allowed the demons of distrust to takeover and destroy her completely.



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